Emma Bass -The Modern Classicist -Amazing Botanical Photographs

Emma-Bass, Art, Floral-Design, Flowers, Botanical, Floral, Flower-Arrangement, Photography, Women-Artist, New-Zealand-Artist, Artist, Photographer, Beautiful-Art

 

New Zealand photographer Emma Bass creates bright and modern yet painterly images of flowers in exquisite arrangements. That elusive artistic talent…flawless composition ….returns us over and over to her delightful imagery. Emma’s work has been widely exhibited in New Zealand and may be found in international private and corporate collections and she was the only New Zealander invited to exhibit at the Royal Academy’s 2016 Summer Exhibition, London.

It was such a pleasure to interview the talented artist for the blog, and we hope you enjoy learning more about Emma Bass’s work as much as we did.

 

Emma-Bass, Art, Floral-Design, Flowers, Botanical, Floral, Flower-Arrangement, Photography, Women-Artist, New-Zealand-Artist, Artist, Photographer, Beautiful-Art

 

Tell us a bit about your background? 

I have always seen the world in a compositional way and through a lens. It all started while I was working as a nurse in London during the late 1980s. I did a photography course in Leicester Square and was completely hooked.  I came back to New Zealand where I properly trained for two years and started a career within editorial and commercial photography over a span of 23 years.

I’ve always loved flowers – they are my constant yet ever-changing muse.  As an art photographer who also worked in the milieu of glossy magazines, I became obsessed with finding the ‘perfect’ vessel to team with the ‘perfect’ arrangement. Then one day, a truth dawned. I uncoupled myself from this endless, fruitless search and began to capture reality.  This is when my first body of work Imperfect was formed.

 

Emma-Bass, Art, Floral-Design, Flowers, Botanical, Floral, Flower-Arrangement, Photography, Women-Artist, New-Zealand-Artist, Artist, Photographer, Beautiful-Art

 

I see flowers as one of the most universal forms of beauty. Every culture celebrates them in some way – from the East where they are meditative offerings, to the West, where in the time of the Dutch Masters, they were symbols of wealth and status. They are also tokens of love and a natural expression of the environment. During difficult times, they are a reprieve. Some, like peonies, are impossibly beautiful. But because they bloom and fade so quickly, they are also metaphors of life and death.

 

 

Emma-Bass, Art, Floral-Design, Flowers, Botanical, Floral, Flower-Arrangement, Photography, Women-Artist, New-Zealand-Artist, Artist, Photographer, Beautiful-Art

 

Your process for making your artwork?

In the body of work Imperfect, I found the freedom to no longer peddle perfection. I embraced emerging decay: the maligned, blemished and slightly broken. I paired flowers gathered roadside – including dandelions and cowslip grass – with blooms from friends’ gardens, and displayed them in preloved vases found on eBay. The images were shot not in a studio, but on a stairwell ledge within my home amidst the comforting chaos of family life. I noted the time each image was captured. The decline in the blooms is not obvious or pitiful, but subtle and seductive.  I found the beauty in the imperfect.

 

 

Emma-Bass, Art, Floral-Design, Flowers, Botanical, Floral, Flower-Arrangement, Photography, Women-Artist, New-Zealand-Artist, Artist, Photographer, Beautiful-Art

 

Most inspiring photographer or artist? 

I have a house filled with botanical art, which I’ve collected from New Zealand and further ashore. I like to be surrounded by all flower forms and am interested in how other artists perceive the floral genre.

I love the work of English artist Ann Carrington who makes incredible sculptures of flower arrangements out of English silver cutlery.  Karl Blossfeldt did beautiful botanical studies in the early 1900s, and I love the Dutch Masters, which I’ve found inspirational for my second body of work Embellish.

In 2016, I had a work accepted into the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in London and while there I visited a Dutch flower still life exhibition at the National Gallery. To see these exquisite masterpieces up close in the flesh was quite a pivotal moment.

 

Emma-Bass, Art, Floral-Design, Flowers, Botanical, Floral, Flower-Arrangement, Photography, Women-Artist, New-Zealand-Artist, Artist, Photographer, Beautiful-Art

 

Favorite historic house or contemporary design? 

I love the era of the 50s, the modernist era.  I live in a 1950s house and love the clean lines, the open spaces, and large windows that fill the house with luminous light.  I would love to own a Frank Lloyd Wright house in my dreams.

 

Design Innovation -A Taste of Magic with Jaime Hayón and Lladró Atelier

AMB. THE GUEST-11

The Spanish luxury porcelain manufacturie Lladró has a new direction and it’s one of great creativity and innovation. Working with top contemporary artists and designers the high-end Spanish porcelain company keeps surprising the world with their inventive collaborations.

One of the most interesting lines is the amazing Guest Series headed by Spanish design icon Jaime Hayón. This innovative series includes 250 limited-edition pieces, and a selection of numbered editions. Invited leading designers and artists have included the contemporary American graphic artist and painter Gary Baseman, well-regarded biomorphic painter Tim Biskup, the creative Japanese design team Devilrobots, and the French illustrator Rolito as well as top UK designer Paul Smith.

This is porcelain remade – a true example of a delightful combination of handmade craft, artisan construction and modern design coming together.

 

THE GUEST-AMB 19

 

 

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The Guest project is a captivating special collaborative project that included a number of Imagine these gorgeously fun porcelains in your interior….

Owning one of The Guest series porcelain sculptural porcelain pieces means having a piece of contemporary of art in your home, a perfect way to begin your art collection, add to your decor or as an amazing  gift for your creative friends or family.

For more decorating with high design and style and art ideas visit the Lladró site and blog!

 

Thank you to Lladró!

Hanna Nyman’s Gardens of Paper

flower-art, swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

Hanna Nyman is a Swedish artist and product designer whose beautifully hand constructed paper works are a world onto themselves, a world of light and gardens overlapped with fanciful patterning.

Hanna began in screen printing on textiles as well as print design and one of her first major paper projects included a magnetic wallpaper with three-dimensional flowers growing out of the pattern, shown at Stockholm Furniture fair. After graduation she worked as a print designer in fashion for several years. Working with paper came naturally to Hanna, her own father was a printer, and the floral themes draw from time spent with her grandmother a florist.  The artist’s ongoing sculptural paper series Back to Poetry was a turning point for her and led to a focus on paper art.  It was pleasure to interview Hanna about her creative story and project!

swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

Art as poem, poem as art, tell me more about this relationship and way of working?

This idea was actually born at art school when we did our final project for graduation. All the lecturers and professor during the years had described my work as poetic. I never really understood what they meant so I decided to get inspiration from a poem for this last project and figure it out.

This was so powerful to me! The poem that I chose lived with me those month. Every time I read it a found something new about it.

My work is narrative rather than functional. Poetry is also narrative – a feeling.

Tell me a bit about your process, inspiration, conceptualization, experiments, and what types of paper and materials do you use?

I always start my day with a quick look through Instagram and get my dose of inspiration straight away. I get the most energy when I look at artists that work with different materials or have a different style. I also find interior design very inspiring.

I usually get really inspired by the colors and hand feel of the different papers in paper shops. Normally I don’t have a clue of what I will make when I go in there but when I go out my mind is full of ideas.

nature, strong-man, circus, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

swan, collage, paper-collage, love, paper-flowers, flower-art, swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

I almost never draw any sketch before I start to cut. I have a picture in my head and I just make up as I go along. It’s very liberating and experimental for me to work like this. I use different types of paper. Thick, thin, newspaper. Once I made huge pieces for a client made out of garbage.

This is what’s so amazing with paper. It’s flat and boring at start but if you put some effort into it, it can become something amazing.

bunny, rabbit, collage, paper-collage, love, paper-flowers, flower-art, swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

Did you make art as a child? Can you tell me more about your training and background?

I made all kind of arts as a child. Mostly I used to paint on stuff and make my own doll houses and small furniture out of cardboard. I was also into wooden crafts in high-school. We had a really nice workshop with all the machines and material plus the best teacher. So I spent most of my time there. After high-school the plan was to keep on study furniture design. But somehow I moved to London and started study fashion design. I moved back home after a year and after a couple of years all I did was make clothes until I realized that it was the decoration that appealed to me, not the clothes themselves.

At this point I started to study at Konstfack. I was accepted as a “special student”, and that meant that I could use the whole school, every department however I wanted. This was perfect for me as I had a background in different materials. When I think about those years i still think this was the most creative place I’ve ever been and it was just wonderful. It was at this time I started to work with paper.

Not many people have seen the flowers and sculptures in real life.

collage, paper-collage, love, paper-flowers, flower-art, swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

Why florals? Are there specific traditions you refer to in painting, textile art or illustration you find yourself drawn to?

My grandmother was a florist. I remember growing up visiting her at the shop. I sat on the counter and just looked at all the beauty. Maybe that’s why I always been drawn to flowers. When I was working a lot with all-over prints my favorite was always making big colourful florals.

If you would describe your vision and style in a few sentences what would you say?

I use my paper sculptures as illustrations. A big part of the final result is the photography. It gives me the chance to set the tone and feeling to the picture. I like to keep the colours a bit toned down together with black and a splash of a strong color. A dream would of course be so show them somewhere in the future to the public in some way.

collage, paper-collage, love, paper-flowers, flower-art, swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmadecollage, paper-collage, love, paper-flowers, flower-art, swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

ribbons, paper-ribbons, collage, paper-collage, love, paper-flowers, flower-art, swan, art, design, paper-art, paper-craft, hanna-nyman, Swedish-art, illustration, contemporary-women-artist, Scandinavian, floral-art, flowers, handmade

You may learn more about artist and designer Hanna Nyman’s beautifully constructed paper spaces and gardens on her website, shop or via Instagram @backtopoetry

Pop Artist James Rosenquist -Memories

The great Pop Artist James Rosenquist died on Friday and his enduring sense of high design means my memory of him belongs here too, not just on the art blog.

 

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James Rosenquist a Great American Painter died on Friday.

During my time at the Guggenheim and as well at MoMA, I met plenty of celebrity artists, but I remember James Rosenquist with an enduring fondness. It was not just the enormity of his fame and those colossal paintings that required a legion to hang….not to mention incredible engineering and cleverness, it was the man….maybe later I can say something more insightful or meaningful but for now, I will say what comes to mind and heart immediately.  How can I do anything else?

It is Rosenquist’s intellect, grace, and strength of character that stay with me, not to mention the dazzling color of those beautiful paintings.

James Rosenquist via NYM

James Rosenquist Pop Artist

Even more exciting I remember looking at new paintings in the studio,  wet with paint, that surface so resplendently flamboyant, while my colleagues and I listened to his narrative about the picture and the process. Not one to ride on the heels of star-studded fame and masterworks, the artist painted furiously even then.

And the stories…amazing tales of mid-century America, artists, and strangeness. I forget a lot of these nights in foreign countries from my long sojourns abroad for exhibitions, but I shall always remember the nights spent with my colleagues and friends in Germany on the Rosenquist tour, and of course the artist, and his amazing way in the world. Please visit my art blog for the full story.

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James Rosenquist November 29 1933 – March 31 2017

Good bye James Rosenquist, with loving comfort to your family. It was a beautiful thing to have known you and worked with you and those around you. 

See more about the artist @ NYT |The Guardian | HuffingtonPost |Artnet News

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Illustrator Jeannie Phan LOVES Gardening

Jeannie Phan’s Sweet Secrets -Illustrations

Jeannie Phan, Illustration for Bitch Magazine

 

My hands don’t know how to do anything else but draw….

 

 

 

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THIS IS A REPOST OF ARTICLE FROM MY ARTBLOG

Jeannie Phan’s way with the seemingly mundane is immediately captivating. The young Canadian artist employs a simple schematic way of drawing, color and cutout like elements allowing a readable pictogram of sorts, a concept left abstract yet full of suggestion.

We see this in Jeannie’s Instagram posts of everyday life, here and there, a moment of seemingly mundane intimacy, exhaustion, gluttony, a woman asleep at a late solo dinner table, the intensity of the rat race mirrored in the face of a weary office worker. There are also simple moments of grace: careful gardening or a pleasantly fat and unaware house cat observed…

 

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Jeannie has a simple yet charming way of drawing her audience inwards, into the place of words, the stories told in the images or the text her pictures might accompany. One rather has the sense that one has stumbled into a place uninvited, the tiny details unfurling like a child’s bedtime story.

 

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Jeannie Phan for Montecristo Magazine

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The artist is an avid gardener and some of her most compelling pieces include moments of an urban garden. Strangeness and extraordinary acts meet in the series Night Trowels produced to complement the story in Nuovo magazine about the night gardening habits of  Disneyland’s team of horticulturists.

 

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Jeannie Phan, Night Trowels, Nuovo Magazine

An impressive rooster of high-profile clients grace the resume of this young artist including The New Yorker, The New York Times and The Globe and Mail.

 

 

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Jeannie Phan Clearing the Air, Illustration for Nuovo Magazine

 

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RB: How do you manage to harmonize the client’s requirements, motifs, storyline etc. with your artistic vision?

JP: I find I’m the most creative when I have parameters, which, applied to my work is what the clients needs are. Usually as illustrators, we all have our own visual vocabulary, we draw people a certain way, use certain colours, etc. As long as I’m using my own visual vocabulary, I feel my artistic vision and integrity still stays put despite illustrating something else’s story or idea.

 

RB: Gardens, animals, and working people –these motifs are present in many of the works, as well as rounded geometry, can you elaborate?

JP: I love the calmness and order of geometry, so it tends to find its way into my work. Gardens lend themselves so easily to being muses: I just love plants and growing them is a big hobby of mine. As for working people, I have an acute interest in office work culture, since as a freelancer, I work in such a totally different way.

 

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RB: The Toronto art scene is quite vibrant and full of talent, how does this inform your practice?

 

JP: I love living in this city day-to-day, but in terms of the creative community specifically, there are a lot of wonderfully like-minded people who are passionate and full of ideas for the future. I’m currently a member of Lunchroom, a creative family that cooks and eats together….

 

 

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RB: Tell us a little more about the Swim project?

JP: “Swim” was a personal zine I created when I fell in love with swimming. I needed a break from my work life, and would submerge myself (literally) in water to zone out and relax in a weightless space.

 

 

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Learn More…instagram / twitter / facebook /dribbble

The Doberman Chair -Great Contemporary Chinese Design- Zha Lianghao-Shanghai

Zha Lianghao The Doberman Project

 

“I think the most important Chinese aesthetic is harmony. It means that the design must in the right place, not too much or too less.” 

 

We can look to China these days for artistic talent, innovative and beautiful design objects. One such player is the Shanghai based designer  Zha Lianghao. The young designer is truly innovative, fusing craft with beauty -and we have to say well, the Doberman Chair -it’s the ultimate artist chair!

Zha Lianghao’s  sleek, conceptually driven project The Doberman Chair has caught the attention of many in the design world. Having only recently graduated from Donghua University, he works today for SAIC and has earned a reputation for a sleek sophisticated sense of design, informed by his industrial and product design and engineering training.

The creation of the Doberman Chair was driven by the artist’s questions about “the pairing of the renaissance of traditional handicraft and contemporary design meeting the  demand of today’s world.

 

the doberman chair

 

It may come as no surprise that Zha Lianghao admires the enduringly modern oeuvre of Charles and Ray Eames. He also notes his appreciation for the work of Daniel Simon, the German conceptual designer, Ross Lovegrove, and Jonathan Ive.

 

Zha Lianghao Doberman Chair_Golden Ratio Final Sketch

golden ratio concept…

The Doberman Chair is Zha Lianghao’s first piece of furniture design, and he shares its genesis:

 

“The Doberman chair was my very last project in university. In planning the work, I used some car design processes. I was very surprised at its popularity. I know that for myself, I like a wide variety of design styles in many mediums such as video games, animation, movies, as well as concept arts, but it really surprised me that other people really responded to the project. Today I work for a Chinese motor company as a car interiors designer. I love to design in different fields, because it broadens my thinking, and gets me closer to my goal of designing something unseen.”

 

Zha Lianghao is remarkably transparent about the process of conceptualizing, developing and making. As such, he contributes to the design and artistic field, allowing his own creative and construction process to be seen, and to be, in part, a formative teaching moment as well as a powerful engagement with the design industry and community. You can see the entire process on his Behance profile.

 

Zha Lianghao 152 sketches

Zha Lianghao Doberman Chair_Sketches

working Zha Lianghao

All Images Courtesy and Property of the Artist.

trending style -art & decor embroidered hoop pictures

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Caitlin Benson, Cinder and Honey

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Sarah K Benning

 

 

The delicacy, graphic flair and beauty of handmade hoop embroidery has long held my attention and now has been making the front pages of various blogs and style magazine. Here are a few of my favorites …..because i like small hand sewn things..

 

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Caitlin Benson, Cinder and Honey

 

Molly Projects shot in the studio

Molly Projects, Via Molly Makes Issue 56

 

 

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Caitlin Benson, Cinder & Honey

Sarah K Benning via the everygirl

Sarah K Benning

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Elista

 

women & wolves

 

 

 

Lilli Waters Black Sunday Serie

 

Wolves and Women have much in common. Both share a wild spirit.Women and Wolves are instinctual creatures, able to sense the unseen. They are loyal, protective of their packs and of their pups. They are wild and beautiful. Both have been hunted and captured. Even in captivity, one can see in the eyes of a Woman, or a Wolf, the longing to run free, and the determination that should the opportunity arise, Whoosh, they will be gone…..[Women who run with the Wolves] Clarissa Pinkola Estés

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               @carmela gigantiello
@ailim.blogg.se:
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@storyofearth
Dan Newcomb, Photo @whitewolfpack.com
@thelivingwiccan
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pup @whitewolfpack.com
@whitewolfpack

Cléo de Mérode, A Belle Époque Dancer

A favorite muse of Gustav Klmit, Edgar Degas, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Alexandre Falguiere, Cleopatra Diane de Merode was an accomplished ballet dancer, famous not only for her extraordinary dancing, but also for her graceful beauty. Born 1874, Bordeaux, Paris, France in 19874, Cleo was only 8 when she joined the Opera School of Dance, at 11, she was a professional dancer, and at 13 danced in Choryhee. She became acquainted with he quickly became a favorite of many artists of the time including Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustav Klimt, Edgar Degas and Alexandre Falguiere. 

 

Cléo de Mérode.jpgCleo de Mérode, marble sculpture Mariano Benlliure, 1910Nadar Cleo de Mérode

belle epoque Cleo de Mérode

 

Cléo de Mérode@artandartists.org5c58080b1a110974780a3727a5dd68ccca9c2ad62b50d4b62b4a03c8b0c0c053Moritz Daniel Oppenheim - Marriage Portrait of Charlotte de Rothschild, 1836@victoria and albert museum, london Merode's theatre costume. am authentic siamese dance costume0ab68a9490f740e896f8386424f76b70

Block Printing

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Block printing is a historic artistic technique spanning culture and many centuries. It is used both for textiles, paper decoration and design. Styles tend to be quite diverse, varying regionally, some images and patterns or graphic and bold whereas others showcase great carving skill with the addition of many details.

 

 

Block printing traces as far back as the fifth century BC, and can be summarized as an image produced by the stamp of carved block (linoleum, wood, rubber & old potatoes). While much of the finest work comes from India, there are also many notable East Asian and American artists working today.

 

 

 

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Two Notebooks by contemporary artist Kathryn Watson. 

 

 

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A 17th century example of block printing on clothing from the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

 

 

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Intricate botanical carving block by the talented Jeanne McGee.

 

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Jen Hewett is a contemporary American artist whose gorgeous textiles are a unique admixture of African pictorial traditions, mid century modernism & a great sensitivity to texture, color and patterning.